L.A. Police Commission Unveils Process That Could Lead To Public Release Of LAPD Video

In the months since the Los Angeles Police Department began rolling out thousands of body cameras to officers, during a time when video has prompted new scrutiny of policing across the country, a key question persists. When should the footage become public? On Tuesday, the civilian board that oversees the LAPD began a process to review the department’s current policy of generally withholding that video —whether it was captured by body cameras, patrol car cameras or otherwise collected during an investigation— unless ordered to release it in court. Some police commissioners, along with Chief Charlie Beck, have indicated in recent months that they were open to revisiting the policy, but Tuesday marked a more formal step toward that.

Skid Row Shooting Tests LAPD Body-Worn Cameras Procedures

The officer-involved shooting Sunday, March 1, on skid row that left a man dead could be an early test of the Los Angeles Police Department’s new body camera program for officers. The encounter was recorded by body cameras worn by at least one of the officers involved in the incident.

L.A. Mayor Plans to Equip City’s Police Officers With Body Cameras

TASER International (NASDAQ: TASR) announced the purchase of 860 AXON body-worn video cameras and a five-year subscription to by the Los Angeles Police Department (LAPD). Los Angeles Mayor Eric Garcetti further announced a plan by the city to equip a total of 7,000 officers with body cameras in 2015.

LAPD’s Growing Use of Surveillance State Technology

With the recent protest in Ferguson, MO over the shooting of Michael Brown and the heavy handed response of the Ferguson police department, bringing out mine-resistant ambush protected vehicles (MRAP), tear gas, snipers, and camouflaged dressed cops, much focus has been put on the militarization of the police force. Los Angeles is no stranger to a militarized police force. The LAPD created the first SWAT team in the nation in 1967. You could say L.A. started the trend in police force militarization.

LAPD OIG Audit Finds Police Station Cameras Flawed

After an audit by LA’s Office of the Inspector General highlighted flaws in Los Angeles police stations’ security video, police Chief Charlie Beck says cameras will be repaired and training will improve. City News Service reports Beck told the Police Commission on Tuesday that recession-era budget cuts have prevented improvements to the department’s video monitoring […]