legal

Chamberlain Group Files Patent Infringement Lawsuit Against Nortek Security

The Chamberlain Group, Inc. (CGI), a leader in garage door opener and access control solutions, filed a patent infringement lawsuit against Nortek Security & Control LLC (NSC) on Thursday, November 30, 2017. Lawsuit Alleges Infringement on Three Patents for Inventions that Improve Safety and Energy Efficient Operation of Garage Doors and Gates; Patented Technology Used in Chamberlain® and LiftMaster® Brands

LEGAL: Use Of Cameras Installed In The Workplace For Monitoring Employees

Israel has set a baseline for ‘secret’ video surveillance in the workspace and has codified it. The unlawful use of surveillance cameras to monitor employees in the workplace exposes the employer to civilian (including employment related and tortious), administrative and criminal action. An employer must establish a specific and detailed policy with respect to the use of surveillance cameras and it must notify its employees of this policy. Such a policy is necessary for establishing that the employer has obtained the employees’ informed consent.

Cliven Bundy Trial Delayed Over Handling Of Surveillance Cameras

The trial against Cliven Bundy and his sons was delayed for a week over questions about whether the government withheld surveillance videos of the Bundy Ranch during the 2014 standoff. Jurors were about to be called into the courtroom to hear opening statements Tuesday when the trial derailed and federal prosecutors were asked to account for evidence they said did not exist.

BriefCam Credited For Catching Alleged Child Predator

Meet Sgt. O’Hare of the Hartford PD who used BriefCam to locate and arrest a suspected child predator just last week at the BriefCam booth at ASIS 2017 in Dallas. Jose Japla-Yanes, 34, of Hartford, CT, was arraigned in Superior Court Thursday, after he allegedly tried to lure a 10-year-old girl into his van, and exposed himself to her while she walked to her school bus stop Monday morning. Police said the incident took place on Stonington Street in Hartford. A concerned citizen helped the little girl and called police.

Indian Supreme Court Landmark Ruling On Privacy

India’s Supreme Court has ruled that citizens have a fundamental right to privacy. The judges ruled the right to privacy was “an intrinsic part of [Indian Constitution] Article 21 that protects life and liberty.” The ruling has implications for the government’s vast biometric ID scheme, covering access to benefits, bank accounts, and payment of taxes. Rights groups are concerned personal data could be misused. The authorities want registration to be compulsory.

6-Year-Old May Have Been Slapped By Bus Driver – Parents Want Video For Answers

A Belleville, IL, family has questions about a school bus incident that the surveillance video would answer, which is why they say they’ve been asking to see the video for the last four months. Stacy and Mic Barringer say their 9-year-old daughter told them in April that a Belleville school bus driver slapped their son, who was 6-years-old, on his arm. At the time of the alleged incident, the school district, Belleville District 118, had a contract with the private bus company First Student, Inc., which employed the driver. The driver was later reassigned to a different route, according to the family and the district.

Did You Catch An Employee Thief? Should You Prosecute?

There are many factors whether you should prosecute an employee after you have caught them red-handed. Although sometimes the decision is not yours, but simply a matter of your organizations policy or your legal teams decision. When that decision is yours to make or yours to convince others, there are many factors to consider. The time involved for you and your team can be very costly, as preparing for trial, the trial itself, and perhaps fighting or preparing an appeal can appear to outweigh the value of prosecution. You must consider what else is on your agenda to establish whether you can afford your time, or others’ time in your organization.

NY Bill Would Enable Lawsuit For Nonconsensual Backyard Surveillance

New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo recently signed a bill into law that allows homeowners to sue a neighbor for invasion of privacy if the neighbor secretly records recreational activities in the homeowner’s backyard. The bill, sponsored by state Sen. Cathy Young, R-Cattaraugus County, and Assemblyman Ed Braunstein, D-Queens, builds on a 2003 law that made it a felony to videotape someone without their permission in an intimate setting where there would be a reasonable expectation of privacy, such as a bedroom or bathroom.

Police: Think Twice Before Sharing Video Surveillance Of Crimes

We’re living in the age of video surveillance. Unfortunately, we see it most often when one of us has been violated by crooks. Crimes like package thefts, car prowls, even hit-and-run crashes may never have been solved had it not been for the watchful eye of security cameras. But one Puget Sound police department is warning people to think twice before sharing evidence on social media; otherwise the investigation could be over before it begins.