drones

U.S. Army Bans DJI Drones

An August 2 memo cites ‘increased awareness of cyber vulnerabilities’ with drones from China’s market-leading DJI. The U.S. Army has ordered troops to stop using consumer drones made by Chinese manufacturer DJI, according to an Aug. 2 memo seen by Defense One and confirmed by two Army officials. “Cease all use, uninstall all DJI applications, remove all batteries/storage media from devices, and secure equipment for follow on direction,” reads the memo from Lt. Gen. Joseph H. Anderson, the Army’s deputy chief of staff for plans and operations. Why? The memo cited “increased awareness of cyber vulnerabilities associated with DJI products.” Service officials declined to elaborate.

Security Industry Veteran Establishes Autonomous Security Association

In order to promote and advance autonomous security vehicles –ground, marine, and aerial– a security industry veteran is announcing the formation of the Autonomous Security Association. This trade association is a focused venue for autonomous security technology partners and market experts working with surveillance and security robotics to advance the understanding and awareness of the autonomous security marketplace. Autonomous Security Association focuses on the unmanned vehicles and robotics industry and supports all forms of platforms including ground, air, and marine vehicles coupled with a broad spectrum of robotic initiatives including commercial, medical, military, personal, and industrial security applications.

As Drones Become Norm In Police Work, A SoCal Police Department Explains Why It Bought In

Whether the intent is to find lost seniors suffering from dementia or support a manhunt for fleeing suspects, police in Chula Vista, California, (just east of San Diego) are turning to drones for quick aerial intelligence. Alongside the city’s fire department, the Chula Vista Police Department (CVPD) is investing in the technology as a way to maximize time spent by officers on tactical operations.

FAA Deputy Administrator Says Privacy, Preemption Are Two Biggest UAS Issues

Marke “Hoot” Gibson, the deputy administrator of the Federal Aviation Administration, said two of the biggest issues facing the FAA related to unmanned aviation systems, or drones, are privacy and preemption. Gibson said the FAA is not in the business of dealing with privacy, but there is a long history of case law dealing with traditional aviation. “However, it has generally dealt with noise and airports —this is personal use— it comes right in your back yard,” he said, referring to unmanned aircraft.

US Requires Drones to Be Registered

The U.S. Department of Transportation will require recreational drone operators to register their aircraft with the federal government. A new task force has been formed to determine which aircraft should be exempt from the registration The federal government will seek to register all drones, including the lighter, remote-controlled crafts favored by hobbyists, so it can track down any drone pilots who collide with other aircraft or violate rules for safe flights. Transportation Secretary Anthony Foxx said recently the new rules will apply to hobbyists as well as commercial drone operators, who already register.

Aerialtronics and Bosch Security Projects Pool Their Expertise for Security Video Drones

Aerialtronics and Bosch Security Projects have initiated a strategic cooperation aimed at making “video drones”, or drones equipped with video cameras, for improved security applications. The rationale for Bosch to choose Aerialtronics for this joint project is the high level of reliability, stability and versatility offered by our Altura unmanned aerial systems (UAS).

Few Laws Regulate Police Use of Surveillance Systems

Police across the country are using increasingly sophisticated surveillance systems to monitor daily life in their communities. Ultra-high-definition cameras, software that can read license plates and recognize faces, and systems that can alert police to suspicious behavior have given law enforcement unprecedented access to our everyday activities. Average citizens and privacy advocates say the ability to monitor and record public activity at such an extraordinary level is a threat to personal privacy.

Drone on Drones: New Court Decision Reflects Shifting Views on Privacy in Public

Whenever drone policy is raised as a topic, privacy concerns follow close behind it as a discussion point. The idea of aerial surveillance that is cheaper, less time-intensive, and requires fewer man hours to get off the ground leads immediately to concerns about the development of a surveillance state, where individuals can be monitored round the clock, and every public action can be recorded for posterity.

Could Police Drones Be an Unexpected Guest in Your Yard?

Legislation passed by the N.C. General Assembly would allow drones to take pictures of an open-invitation gathering, even if it’s on private property, without a warrant. North Carolina is figuring out the boundary between expectations of privacy and the use of surveillance drones by law enforcement agencies.

Aviation Experts Address Drone Fears at GTA Conference

Airport investigators, fresh after marking the 9/11 anniversary, are gathering in the GTA to share information on the latest security threats to the flying public. Police said threats made on social media against Pearson airport, other airports, and the threat of attacks by unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV), or drones, are some of the issues facing investigators at a conference next month.