FAA Deputy Administrator Says Privacy, Preemption Are Two Biggest UAS Issues

Marke “Hoot” Gibson, the deputy administrator of the Federal Aviation Administration, said two of the biggest issues facing the FAA related to unmanned aviation systems, or drones, are privacy and preemption. Gibson said the FAA is not in the business of dealing with privacy, but there is a long history of case law dealing with traditional aviation. “However, it has generally dealt with noise and airports —this is personal use— it comes right in your back yard,” he said, referring to unmanned aircraft.

US Requires Drones to Be Registered

The U.S. Department of Transportation will require recreational drone operators to register their aircraft with the federal government. A new task force has been formed to determine which aircraft should be exempt from the registration The federal government will seek to register all drones, including the lighter, remote-controlled crafts favored by hobbyists, so it can track down any drone pilots who collide with other aircraft or violate rules for safe flights. Transportation Secretary Anthony Foxx said recently the new rules will apply to hobbyists as well as commercial drone operators, who already register.

Standard for Airport Security Access Control Systems

Available at No Cost to U.S. Airport Operators is the recently produced document Standard for Airport Security Access Control Systems. DO-230D provides guidance on acquiring and designing airport security access control systems, testing and evaluating system performance, and operational requirements.

FAA Approves First Unmanned Quadrotor Already Used By U.S. Military

The Instant Eye small unmanned aerial system received approval from the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) to be used by an energy company, which will conduct research, development, and training to see if the system is practical for inspecting infrastructure such as pipelines, power lines, and insulators on towers. It is the first unmanned quadrotor to […]