Legislation

Four More States Propose Biometrics Legislation

In recent years, the plaintiffs’ class action bar has focused its efforts on pursuing claims under legislative schemes that provide for statutory damages. The litigation explosion under the Telephone Consumer Protection Act (TCPA) is a textbook example of how enterprising lawyers exploit laws that provide for such uncapped damages in an attempt to extract large settlements for technical violations that, in many cases, have caused no cognizable harm. As plaintiffs begin to explore new claims under these legislative schemes, we seek to help our clients minimize their risk through heightened awareness of the technical requirements of new and existing laws, vigilant compliance programs, and aggressive defense against litigation. Biometrics is one such area.

NY Appeals Court Decision Signals Cybersecurity Whistleblowing Implicates Corporate Theft

Most people don’t think about what whistleblower laws may protect them until they need them. Many information security professionals may be surprised to learn that they are protected by the law although no law specifically protects “cybersecurity” whistleblowers. This is because issues involving information security are rarely only about information security. The criminal case of […]

SIA Renews Support For Bipartisan DIGIT Act

The Security Industry Association (SIA) announced its continued support of the bipartisan Developing and Growing the Internet of Things (DIGIT) Act, reintroduced in the Senate on January 10th, 2017, by the Internet of Things (IoT) working group. The group consists of Sens. Deb Fischer, R-Neb., Cory Booker, D-N.J., Cory Gardner, R-Colo., and Brian Schatz, D-Hawaii. Sen. Fischer, the bill’s chief sponsor, again recognized SIA as a key supporting organization in a press release.

Germany Approves Regulation To Allow Expansion Of Video Surveillance Network

Germany’s strict privacy laws prevent the widespread usage of surveillance cameras, but the coalition government on Wednesday approved regulation that could change things. Germany would allow more video surveillance in public places, under a draft law passed by the cabinet on Wednesday, reflecting growing security fears in a country that has for decades been wary of police intrusion. The bill was agreed in principle by the parties in Angela Merkel’s coalition last month, well before Monday’s deadly truck attack on a Christmas market in Berlin that was claimed by Islamic State.

Bill Designed To Expedite Cross-Border Travel With Canada Passes Congress

A bipartisan bill designed to improve cross-border travel between Canada and the U.S. has passed Congress and is headed to the president’s desk. The bill, officially known as the “Promoting Travel, Commerce, and National Security Act” aims to streamline travel and commerce between the U.S. and Canada by allowing for more pre-clearance of passengers traveling between countries. Pre-clearance is when passengers undergo border inspections prior to traveling and can help to avoid bottlenecks at border-crossings.

SIA Hails Passage Of Power And Security Systems Act

SIA has led a coalition in support of extending the current exemption for security and life safety products, which is set to expire on July 1, 2017. Without an extension, manufacturers must redesign EPS products to meet the “no-load” standard, more than doubling their cost unnecessarily. H.R. 6375 is supported by SIA, the National Electrical Manufacturers Association, and the Electronic Security Association, which have also worked with energy efficiency community on the common-sense provision.

Evidence Lost? Utah Law No Help When Video Or Audio Not Saved

If a government agency loses a document or video that you need to help prove your case in court, you’re just out of luck. In several recent Northern Utah cases, data wanted as evidence in criminal or civil cases could not be produced by the agencies responsible. And watchers of government records access issues say there’s simply no recourse for anyone burned by the loss of records.

Drone Defense: Not So Fast Says FAA

Unmanned Aircraft are definitely a transformative technology. They open up the lowest parts of the airspace to productive use. At the same time, they also create new problems for privacy and security. As a result, interest in “drone defense” technology has been skyrocketing. It seems that there is a new innovative defensive system unveiled by entrepreneurs on a weekly basis. A new letter form the Office of Airports Safety and Standards, however, indicates that the FAA would like to slow down and coordinate this new technological stampede.

PA State Senate Bill Allows Police To Deny Requests For Officer Video

Legislation approved by the Pennsylvania state Senate on Wednesday would let police departments across the state refuse public requests for copies of video recordings by officers, unless a court orders the release. The bill sets a sweeping policy to exempt recordings from body cameras and dashboard cameras from public records requests in Pennsylvania.

FAA Deputy Administrator Says Privacy, Preemption Are Two Biggest UAS Issues

Marke “Hoot” Gibson, the deputy administrator of the Federal Aviation Administration, said two of the biggest issues facing the FAA related to unmanned aviation systems, or drones, are privacy and preemption. Gibson said the FAA is not in the business of dealing with privacy, but there is a long history of case law dealing with traditional aviation. “However, it has generally dealt with noise and airports —this is personal use— it comes right in your back yard,” he said, referring to unmanned aircraft.